From a local beach to a carpark

On my morning poodle walks with Ari I have noticed how the Bluff Boat Ramp car park extension at the western end of Encounter Bay is taking out a beach to construct a carpark for boaties, which will they only use during the peak summer Xmas season.

The extension allows for an additional 34 parking spaces to accommodate 14 boat trailers and 20 cars. Currently there are 34 parking spaces for boaies at the Bluff Boat Ramp car park, and this only overflows 4 days a year around Xmas with the summer influx of boaties. The extension costs $548,300 with the Victor Harbor Council receiving funding of $242,150 from the state government for the project.The extension has State Agency (DPTI) support of the project and it was approved by the Development Assessment Commission.

Bluff carpark extension

The current parking area in front of Whalers is used by boaties, school buses, paddlers and sightseers and there is space for approximately 60 cars. But with the boat ramp expansion the parking area will be reduced to only 20 with the rest of area being used strictly for boaties and their cars and trailers. So half a million is being spent for the current car park for boaties and their trailers that will be used for 4 days a year.

A beach goes in the name of car parks to foster tourism.

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field, sea, sky

I have started to walk along the back country roads looking for photographic subjects whilst  on  the afternoon poodle walks with Kayla and Maleko.  I have become tired of sitting in front of the computer screen working on the texts of The Bowden Archives book and I am looking for a break.

This is an example of my recent scoping,   from  an afternoon last week when we were walking along the road to the old Victor Harbor dump:

Waitpingafieldsea

After the dump shifted to Goolwa the ‘no through’ road now leads to the Kings Beach Retreats. There is not much traffic during the week so it is a good back road to walk along with the standard poodles.

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Ari

Ari is going on 16 years of age and he has slowed down a lot. His hearing and sight are limited, he has dementia,  and he  is wobbly on his back legs.  The course of acupuncture is keeping him going as is the companionship with the younger poodles.

The morning walks have decreased in terms of the time spent we spend walking. We walk slowly along the road down to the beach, shuffle

Ari, am, Encounter Bay

The autumn mornings before sunrise are a great time to be walking. It is soft and gentle time. There a few walkers, runners and bikers but it is pretty quiet. So we can meander and hang out amongst the rocks along the beach . We are able to just enjoy the moments together and he still enjoys having his photo taken.

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Gallery?

I have been trying to create a gallery for poodlewalks, but I don’t seem to be able to with this free theme or template. This was the image that I was trying to kick things off with. Another version of the image on a walk late last year around Petrel Cove is on The Littoral Zone blog.

salt pond

Whilst I was trying to create a project page, the first of which is abstractions, I lost the WordPress theme for poodlewalks. I have spent ages trying to find the one that I had been using and which I quite liked.

summer light

With walking along the rocky foreshore of the southern Fleurieu Peninsula out for an Ari, who is unsteady on his legs, I have shifted to walking on sandy beaches and country roads for his morning walk. He now walks on his own with me in the morning and with Suzanne in the afternoon. Kayla and Maleko walk together with Suzanne in the morning and with me in the afternoon. They are becoming easier to handle together.

This picture of roadside grasses– phalaris— was made on an early morning walk inbetween the trips to New Zealand and Tasmania in mid-February:

Grasses, Waitpinga

Grasses, Waitpinga

It had been grey and the light was flat and drab as we walked along the dusty, country road. Then the sun came out from behind the cloud cover for several minutes.

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returning to normal

The high summer season is over, people have returned to work, and we are back from our holiday in Tasmania. Life on the coast, with its early morning and late afternoon poodlewalks, is starting to return to normal.

rock, feather, seaweed

rock, feather, seaweed

I had been busy working on The Bowden Archives and Other Marginalia project throughout January and I didn’t really have the time to update poodlewalks, even though I’d been doing the daily walks.
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summer rains

It’s been a strange summer so far.

It has been cool weather with lots of rain. There has been very little in the way of the hot, dry summer days that we are used to, and that we have come to expect, on the coast. The damp conditions have meant that the wood panels and stairs that I had oiled before Xmas were very slow to dry. The oil fumes hung around for days.

ocean + rain

ocean + rain

The rains have been due to a sub-tropical rain depression that hung over South Australia for several days between Xmas and New Year, destroying all the ripening stone fruit. The depression bought the small flies that clung to your body, and they were really unpleasant on the early morning poodlewalks.

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